Teacher Appreciation: Show Your Favorite Teacher How Important They Are

Education and teacher appreciation looks a lot different right now than what we’re used to. The stresses that our schools are experiencing are felt by everyone, and students, teachers, school staff, and parents are doing what they can to make the best of things. Teachers, like everyone else, were forced to move into the online space with no warning, training, or preparation last spring. But for educators, working remotely is a real hurdle. They miss their students, they miss the regular interaction, and they miss the rejuvenating energy that comes from getting a simple hello or smile from a student in their classroom. As we all continue to adapt to remote learning, consider an impromptu gesture that will show your teacher how much you appreciate them—online learning shouldn’t keep you from recognizing and acknowledging your teacher’s efforts and hard work!

There are plenty of fun and meaningful ways to celebrate and appreciate teachers virtually. Check out some of our favorites below.

Snail Mail

The old classic: a handwritten note! Who doesn’t love getting mail? I’ve saved every note that a student ever gave me. They’re great to look through when you’re feeling down or worried that you aren’t doing enough for your students. A teacher will always appreciate a handwritten note as a reminder that they are making an impact on the life of a student.

Make it Modern

Looking for a more modern take on sending a card? Consider creating a Kudo Board. The free version of this website allows for ten different posts that can include pictures, videos, and GIFs, in addition to text. It’s easy to invite contributors to add to the board without having to register to share their message. If there are more than ten students in your class, just send multiple Kudo Boards!

Consider the Classroom

Take a look at this blog post about thoughtful gifts for teachers, who are often short on supplies and pay out of pocket for what they need. Maybe your teacher has an Amazon wish list for their classroom, and everyone loves gift cards! Or, consider a Teachers Pay Teachers gift card as another alternative. The site is a platform for vetted teacher-designed lesson plans, resources, and ideas for students of all levels and for all content areas.

Pull Off a Parade

Want to really go all out? If you’re a great organizer or coordinator, consider planning a drive-by parade or honk-a-thon to honor a special teacher. First, devise a way to get your teacher in a particular location at a specific time (perhaps you can ask the principal to help!). Next, recruit other students and parents to participate. Make signs, decorate cars, and honk the horns as you drive by.

Surprise!

Of course, you can still surprise your teacher without the grand effort a of parade. Coordinate with other classmates to draw pictures or make signs that show your thanks and respect. Then, at a specified time during an online session, all students can reveal their creations at once. Undoubtedly, your teacher will be delighted and surprised by the production. A similar idea involves preparing a special virtual background that all students can reveal on a given day. Students can design their own backgrounds to demonstrate thanks or to celebrate the teacher’s likes and personal interests.

Do you have other great ideas for how to show teachers some love? We’d love to hear about them and how your teacher reacts! Email the Curriculum and Academics team at discovery@worldstrides.com to share your suggestions.

Article written by Carrie Weber

Carrie Weber
Carrie Weber serves as a Senior Curriculum and Academics Specialist for WorldStrides. She holds an M. Ed. in Secondary Science Education and recently earned a STEM Leadership certificate through the NASA Endeavor program. Her research interests are focused on field experiences to facilitate better understanding of science. Ms. Weber has taught middle and high school science, is certified and licensed in multiple states, and holds multiple College Board AP certifications.